Projected 2017 Exhibition Schedule

 

January               Colette Crutcher/Isaac Roller
February            Rebecca Haseltine
March                 Rebecca Haseltine
April                    Josefa Vaughn
May                    Marc Ellen Hamel
June                    Elaine Michaud
July                     Mauricia Gandara/Pernilla Perssons
August                Mauricia Gandara/Pernilla Perssons
September        Closed for Installation
October              Heidi Hardin/Salma Arastu
November         Heidi Hardin/Salma Arastu
December          Heidi Hardin/Salma Arastu and Fundraiser Exhibition

june 2017 elaine michaud

Elaine Michaud, Magnolia Sieboldii 1 / North Korea, (2015), charcoal/graphite on paper, 22" x 30"

Elaine Michaud, Magnolia Sieboldii 1 / North Korea, (2015), charcoal/graphite on paper, 22" x 30"

For Immediate Release: May 27, 2017


Nation Flowers II
Drawings by Elaine Michaud

Think Round Fine Arts
2140 Bush Street, Suite 1B, San Francisco CA 94115
(between Fillmore and Webster. Gallery entrance is on the driveway.)

June 4 - June 30, 2017
Gallery Hours: 8AM-12PM Tuesdays and Thursdays and by appointment
Reception: Saturday, June 10, 2017 from 4-6PM

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Think Round Fine Arts is pleased to present Nation Flowers II, an exhibit of drawings exploring the cultural symbolism of flowers by Elaine Michaud. The exhibit will open on June 4, 2017, with a public reception on June 10 from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm. The artist will be present to welcome the audience and visitors.The exhibit will be up until June 30th 2017. 

As a member for 25 years of the largest artist colony on the west coast, Michaud maintains a fine arts studio at Hunter's Point Shipyard Artists Colony, a community of artists that serves as a viable support network and showcases San Francisco art via open studio exhibits throughout the year. She received her MFA from San Francisco State University, has exhibited her work throughout the San Francisco Bay Area, and has participated in numerous workshops and residencies. Her work has addressed the nature of family relationships and childhood experience, as well as the symbolism of flowers and forms in nature, exploring issues of family, identity, and the natural environment.

For more information about Elaine Michaud and her work, please visit: http://shipyardartists.com/

Think Round Fine Arts will host this exhibit through June 30, with gallery hours from 8:00 am -12 noon on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and by appointment, at 2140 Bush Street Suite 1B, (between Fillmore and Webster) San Francisco CA, 94115. Gallery entrance door is off of the garage driveway. For information, call: (415) 771-2198 or email: heidi@heidihardin.com and visit: http://www.thinkround.org/index/#/our-artists/

Marc Ellen Hamel's exhibit of monotypes titled Urban Scenes will remain on display until June 30, 2017. 

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To view more artwork by Elaine Michaud, click the image below:

artist's statement
 

We think of home as a place of comfort and also as a reflection of our values. A sense of place feeds our spirit and our need for community and, hopefully, gives us a feeling of belonging. This meaning flows outward from the doorstep of our home to our neighborhood, our town, our county/state/country. Boundaries abide. The symbols we choose collectively to represent us bind us together in the spirit of a common meaning and shared self-understanding. These meanings can express our collective idealized selves, or a perceived truth, and can be constricting or freeing, but are important as an embodiment of beauty and shared meaning.

It is in this spirit that I explore both the formal structure of flowers and the sometimes archaic meanings attached to them by different nations and groups of people—how cultures identify with particular flowers. I find the etymology as interesting and beautiful as the forms themselves. Meanings sometimes migrate from one culture to another, or are completely different from one language to another, and often morph over time. I use image, word and metaphor to try to open up meaning and understanding.

Elaine Michaud

about the artist
 

As a member for 25 years of the largest artist colony on the west coast, Michaud maintains a fine arts studio at Hunter's Point Shipyard Artists Colony, a community of artists that serves as a viable support network and showcases San Francisco art via open studio exhibits throughout the year. She received her MFA from San Francisco State University, has exhibited her work throughout the San Francisco Bay Area, and has participated in numerous workshops and residencies. Her work has addressed the nature of family relationships and childhood experience, as well as the symbolism of flowers and forms in nature, exploring issues of family, identity, and the natural environment.


may 2017 marc ellen hamel

Marc Ellen Hamel, Solitude, (2017), Oil on Canvas, 46 x 40"

Marc Ellen Hamel, Solitude, (2017), Oil on Canvas, 46 x 40"

For Immediate Release: April 22, 2017


Marc Ellen Hamel
Urban Scenes/Rural Walks
Paintings and Monotypes

Think Round Fine Arts
2140 Bush Street, Suite 1B, San Francisco CA 94115
(between Fillmore and Webster. Gallery entrance is on the driveway.)

May 6 - May 29, 2017
Gallery Hours: 8AM-12PM Tuesdays and Thursdays, and by appointment
Reception: Saturday, May 6, 2017, 5-8PM
Artists' Talk: 6:30PM


                                                                                                                                       * * *

Think Round Fine Arts is pleased to present Urban Scenes/Rural Walks, an exhibit of two distinct series of works by San Francisco artist, Marc Ellen Hamel: abstract oil paintings and multi-drop monotypes. The exhibit will open on May 6, 2017, 5:00 pm to 8:00 pm with a public reception, including refreshments. The artist will be present to welcome the audience and visitors. The exhibition will run through May 29, 2017.
 
Marc Ellen Hamel has worked for over 30 years as an abstract oil painter and monotype printmaker.  She is primarily motivated by the interaction of colors, and the rich properties of paint and ink. At the same time, there is an autobiographical element to her work, whether as a record of distinct memories and locations of her life or reflecting the preoccupations of her current life.  All her work remains, however, exciting to the eye, engendering intuitive reactions for the viewer. “Urban Scenes” consists of framed monotypes on paper; “Rural Walks” is a series of abstract oil paintings.

For more information about Ms. Hamel and her artwork, visit her website, www.marcellenhamel.com, or call 415-202-4315
 
Think Round Fine Arts will host this exhibit through May 29, with gallery hours from 8:00 am -12 noon on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and by appointment, at 2140 Bush Street Suite 1B, (between Fillmore and Webster) San Francisco CA, 94115. Gallery entrance door is off of the garage driveway. For information, call: (415) 771-2198 or email: heidi@heidihardin.com and visit: http://www.thinkround.org/index/#/our-artists/

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To view more artwork by Marc Ellen Hamel, click the image below: 

artist's statement


Marc Ellen has worked for over 30 years as as an abstract oil painter and monotype printmaker.  She is primarily motivated by exploring the interactions of colors and the rich properites of paint or ink.  Always there is a personal, often autobiographical theme, whether as a record of distinct memories and locations ofher life (both inner and outer) or following the preoccupations of her current days.  “Urban Scenes” consists of framed monotypes on paper; “Rural Walks” is a group of abstract oil paintings.

The paintings in “Rural Walks” reflect the drenched colors, sunlit shadows, and quiet moments experienced in paths walked through the Plumas County countryside and in city parks and yards.  The nature views are rendered not from photograph, but through recollection.  Layers of paint, alternations of brushstroke and color, are used spontaneously, intuitively, until the thrill of the colors and shapes reimagine the feeling of walks in the countryside. 

In  “Urban Scenes” you see a layered, rectilinear aesthetic that recalls the sidewalks, streets and architectural elements seen while passing through the burgeoning city-grid of San Francisco.  In this series, Hamel uses the monotype process in a spontaneous, yet strictured way, using a multiple-drop style.  Several organizations of visual elements are created, and the paper is sent through the press numerous times to reach the final composition.

Hamel’s paintings and monotypes have been shown in numerous galleries in the Bay Area and Plumas County and are held in collections in the US, Sweden, Switzerland, Germany. Her work can be seen at the SFMOMA Artists Gallery, at Main Street Artists Gallery in Quincy, CA,  and at Open Studio events at the Hunters Point Shipyard, where she has had her art studio since 1993. 

Marc Ellen Hamel

ABOUT THE ARTIST


I grew up in Seattle and  moved to San Francisco in my early 20s.  I majored in art at the University of Washington and since then have taken numerous classes and workshops, but the greatest teacher is uncharted time working alone in the studio, analyzing what I make, reflecting, going back to  a piece, coming up with a new vision.

My work is mostly abstract.  I am fascinated by the interaction of colors and the physical feel and look of paint.  As I apply color, make strokes, clarify areas, an internalized landscape surfaces and I work with that, going back and forth between the immediate physicality of the process and my own place-memory.  I bring out the world of the subconscious; it is at once a world I am making and one I am revisiting.   The challenge is to get thinking out of the way so that the intuitive creative process can move on and make its discoveries.

Oil painting has been my main focus for over 30 years.  In the past few years I have also worked in monotype printmaking.  This medium allows me spontaneity, surprise, with a focus on design elements and color.


april 2017 josefa vaughan

josefa.jpg
josefa2.jpg

Left: Josefa Vaughan, Covered Shoulder, (2017), Graphite on Paper, 20x17.5"
Right: Josefa Vaughan, Head Rest, (2017), Oil Pastel on Paper, 12x9"

For Immediate Release: March 24, 2017


Being in Turbulent Times:
Solo Art Exhibition
Drawings and Paintings by Josefa Vaughan

Think Round Fine Arts
2140 Bush Street, Suite 1B, San Francisco CA 94115
(between Fillmore and Webster. Gallery entrance is on the driveway.)

April 1 - April 30, 2017
Gallery Hours: 8AM-12PM Tuesdays and Thursdays, and by appointment
Reception: Saturday, April 8, 2017, 5-8PM with
Artists' Talk: 6:30PM

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Think Round Fine Arts is pleased to present Being In Turbulent Times, a new solo art exhibit of paintings and drawings by Josefa Vaughan. The exhibit will open April 1, 2017, with a reception including free public wine and cheese for the public on April 8, 2017 from 5PM to 8PM. The artists will be present to welcome the audience and visitors. There will be an artists' talk at 6:30PM. The exhibition will run through April 30, 2017.

Drawing and painting the nude model with fellow artists helped me in my teens to connect with something timeless and human in a rapidly changing world. People interested me. In 1989, I moved from referencing nature to exploring culture. My collaborative conceptual art projects developed from the doodles and anecdotes I collected from people I encountered in diverse walks of life. Ultimately, this approach to art-making evolved into ArtSeed, a nonprofit organization with a mission to connect gifted artists with vulnerable communities through classical and cutting-edge fine arts projects. I’ve enjoyed teaching artistic anatomy to ArtSeed children in these 17 years since its founding.  Forty-five years later, I felt the need to reclaim for myself the peace I found in that practice long ago. Sales from this exhibition will benefit two arts education nonprofits: ArtSeed and Think Round.

Proceeds from sales of art at this event will benefit ArtSeed’s disadvantaged youth and Think Round’s art projects for families.

For more information about Josefa and her work, visit:  www.josefa.com or call (415) 656-8949
For more information about ArtSeed, visit: www.artseed.org

Think Round Fine Arts will host this exhibit through the end of April, with gallery hours from 8AM-12PM on Tuesdays and Thursdays and by appointment, 2140 Bush Street Suite 1B, (between Fillmore and Webster) San Francisco CA, 94115. Gallery entrance is off of the garage driveway. For information, call: (415) 771-2198 or email: heidi@heidihardin.com and visit: 

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To view more artwork by Josefa Vaughan, click the image below:

ARTIST'S STATEMENT
 

“You can, as an artist, try to say something big about life; or be content to make the stuff in your hands come to life. And this humbler task is the greater, for all else merely follows.”  – Leo Steinberg (ArtSeed Founding Advisor) from Other Criteria

It has never seemed quite fair to me that artists are expected to write about their work, while writers are never expected to draw. This more primary form of self-expression is precisely what I, as an artist, have asked others to do, writers among them. Portraiture, which was my earliest interest in art, attracted me as a way to make something tangible out of my daily human interactions.

In 1989 my earlier figurative fantasies were transformed, conversely, by the fantastic figurings (storyboards, a drawing format used in TV production planning) that I collected from seniors and children in contrasting socio-economic regions of the San Francisco Bay Area, New York City, and Houston. For ten years I practiced an about-face to portraiture and the artist’s conventional role by asking everyone I met to be my iconographer.

Solicited marks, and remarks, helped me to look deep outside myself in an attempt to step back in my quest for greater self-awareness and understanding of the world. Developing this archive of storyboards stimulated new friendships, which turned into collaborative artmaking and teaching. And this is how the nonprofit organization, ArtSeed, began.

In 2003 I did an ArtSeed benefit exhibition, Songlines for Seibert’s Pipes, at The Lab, an alternative space in San Francisco. This was the result of my winning a San Francisco Arts Commission Individual Artist grant. I proposed creating “continuation work” (art surrendered to a second artist for its completion) from my earlier life drawings. In this era of intellectual property law and copyright infringement suits, it is difficult to imagine such an arrangement. However, the practice of “successive input” occurred often in medieval Europe and was given a new twist in Robert Rauschenberg’s 1953 Erased de Kooning Drawing. I also asked other artists to give me their “abandoned meanders” to work on.

There are things that an artist brings into the artmaking process in order for a piece to come fully alive. For me, an artwork is not mature until the process includes something risky and interactive.  As a point of departure, and to commemorate my pipe organ-builder grandfather Seibert, participants were asked to reference sounds or pipe-organs’ tubelike shapes. Pipes, simple acoustical chambers, and the most easily drawn illusionistic image, signify communication (as in pipelines) and fantastic ideas – or “pipe dreams.”

Female piety of the thirteenth century was founded on “vicarious communion,” that is, the notion that one person could receive communion for another. Today the viewer who encounters my figure studies becomes a vicarious, if not an actual, participant in the communion I shared with the diverse models who’ve sat for me, and the diverse folks who originally gave me storyboards, or who “continued” my art, or, who let me draw in theirs. Many of their stories have been imbedded in collaborative ArtSeed projects over the years. I believe that the urge to connect with others and to reconcile seemingly opposite points of view is, ultimately, what makes the stuff in your hands come to life.  

 

about the artist
 

Josefa Vaughan’s art education began in Houston, at the age of eleven, when she received free private art instruction from a benefactor of her large working-class family. Her continued self-directed studies as a largely unsupervised teenager lead her to auditing art classes at the University of Texas at Austin. Later, as an unmarried but co-parenting mom, she received various scholarships, including Houston’s Museum of Fine Arts Glassell School, The Art League and the Houston Community College. Since then, she has exhibited her art in numerous venues locally, nationally, and in Paris, and she has received both private and public commissions. She has curated and organized exhibitions of other artists’ work and has served as a board member for numerous arts organizations.

Vaughan was a resident artist at Centrum in Port Townsend, Washington, the Djerassi Resident Artist Program in Woodside CA, the de Young Museum Artist Studio in San Francisco, and was an affiliate artist at Headlands Center for the Arts in Marin County, California. She has lectured at the San Francisco Art Institute, University of California at Davis, San Jose State, and Stanford Universities. She has taught art through the Texas Institute for Arts in Education and in San Francisco at Synergy School, Chinese American International School, San Francisco Arts Education Project, Hills Project, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Studio One in Oakland, and the Oakland Museum of California. She has received two San Francisco Arts Commission awards. Vaughan is founder of ArtSeed, a volunteer-based, nonprofit organization founded in the year 2000 to bring diverse communities together to support the young or disadvantaged in reaching their full potential.

 ArtSeed's mission is to connect the most resourceful and gifted with the youngest or most vulnerable citizens of the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond through projects that explore links between classical and cutting-edge fine arts disciplines. ArtSeed brings artists together with children, elders, or others living with financial or other challenges to engage in year-round innovative and interdisciplinary fine arts instruction, collaborative, socially engaged projects, and long-term artist/youth apprenticeships. These activities culminate in ArtSeed’s annual fine arts summer intensive, exhibition and other community events.

Our vision is of a place where everyone has a chance to fulfill their own potential to make a positive difference in the lives of those around them by inspiring academic and professional achievement, creative self-betterment and an ever-expanding sense of stewardship for a kinder, healthier world.


 

FEBRUARY-MARCH 2017    REBECCA HASELTINE

Rebecca Haseltine, Sluice #6, 2016, Mixed Media on Mylar, 30”x 42”

Rebecca Haseltine, Sluice #6, 2016, Mixed Media on Mylar, 30”x 42”

For Immediate Release: January 21, 2017


The Body Is Not a Figure:
Pourings and Drawings by Rebecca Haseltine


Think Round Fine Arts
2140 Bush Street, Suite 1B, San Francisco CA 94115
(between Fillmore and Webster. Gallery entrance is on the driveway.)

February 1 - March 31, 2017
Gallery Hours: 8AM-12PM Fridays and Saturdays
Reception: February 4, 2017 from 4-7PM
Artists' Talk: 6PM

 

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Think Round Fine Arts is pleased to present The Body Is Not a Figure, a new exhibit of old and new work by Rebecca Haseltine. The exhibit will open February 1, 2017, with a reception for the public on February 4, 2017 from 4PM to 7PM. The artists will be present to welcome the audience and visitors. There will be an artists' talk at 6PM. The exhibition will run through March 31, 2017.

Haseltine’s work has been wowing people for years with her explorations of fluid patterns.  Her work defies categorization, presenting as abstract, and sometimes appearing figurative or even vaguely like landscape, but more often than not described as Rorschach-like.  Her images often float in the center of the page, and typically are on translucent mylar so that when hung in a window they appear to have internal illumination.  They can remind us of tissue under a microscope, a slice of stone or an aerial view of a landscape.
 
Haseltine sources all of her work from within her own body.  She experiments with fluid materials that are impossible to control so the image is much more than she could imagine, invent or create with manual skill. The guided experiments in flow, evaporation, sedimentation, and translucency refer to many different phenomena in nature.  The intent is to evoke both the physiology of the body and the details of the natural world, which are often reflections of each other.
 
Haseltine was originally a performing dancer and is interested in creating art that moves. The mylar pieces often hang away from the wall so they move slightly in the air in response to people moving around them.

For more information about Rebecca and her work, visit: www.rebeccahaseltine.com

Think Round Fine Arts will host this exhibit through the end of March, with gallery hours from 8AM-12PM on Fridays and Saturdays and by appointment, 2140 Bush Street Suite 1B, (between Fillmore and Webster) San Francisco CA, 94115. Gallery entrance is off of the garage driveway. For information, call: (415) 771-2198 or email: heidi@heidihardin.com and visit: http://www.thinkround.org/index/#/our-artists/

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To view more artwork by Rebecca Haseltine, click the image below:

ARTIST STATEMENT


My work has been somatically based for over 25 years.  This means that I source from my body’s experience, rather than visually, from image.  I play with image once a piece gets going, but my intent is to create open images that can be seen in many ways. I am interested in the translation from somatic experience to visual language, and I use drawing and pouring as means of inquiry. Somatic ‘thought’ - or the mind of the body – guides this experiment. The ‘pourings’ explore flow patterns that conjure images from nature – I want to invite awareness not only within the body, but also of the relationship between inner nature and outer nature.

 

ABOUT THE ARTIST
 

Rebecca Haseltine approaches visual art from a somatic perspective – exploring body-based and sensory-based mark-making.  Her art investigates questions about being in a body, and being a part of nature.  Her themes include wetlands, fluids of the body, the brain, forest fires, and embryology. She created a series of collaborative installations based on California estuaries, and recent bodies of work continue the inquiry into the relationship between inner and outer ecology.  Her studio process includes an ongoing study of the nature of water and the resulting patterns it creates.

Over the past 30 years she has worked in several media, beginning with dance, then large-scale movement-based drawings, to prints, to ‘pourings’, then to kinetic sculpture, photography, and now weaving ‘pouring’ and drawing together. 

Rebecca has shown her work extensively and has worked collaboratively with dancers, composers, and filmmakers.

Rebecca has had a studio on the Hunters Point Shipyard in San Francisco for over 25 years.  She also is a certified Somatic Movement therapist and does bodywork and movement education with children and adults.  (www.bodylearning.net)


 

January 2017    Colette crutcher / isaac roller

(Left) Colette Crutcher. Fear Itself. 2002. Acrylic, Collage, & Colored Pencil on Paper. 22" x 30". (Right) Isaac Roller. Killing Joke. 2015-2016. Watercolor. 32" x 12".

(Left) Colette Crutcher. Fear Itself. 2002. Acrylic, Collage, & Colored Pencil on Paper. 22" x 30".
(Right) Isaac Roller. Killing Joke. 2015-2016. Watercolor. 32" x 12".

For Immediate Release: December 22, 2016

Garden of Earthly Dismay
Drawings, paintings, and sculpture
by Colette Crutcher and Isaac Roller


Think Round Fine Arts
2140 Bush Street, Suite 1B, San Francisco CA 94115
(between Fillmore and Webster. Gallery entrance is on the driveway.)

January 7 - January 31, 2017
Gallery Hours: 8AM-12PM Fridays and Saturdays
Reception: January 7, 2017 from 5-8PM
Artists' Talk: 7PM

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Think Round Fine Arts is pleased to present Garden of Earthly Dismay, a new exhibit of drawings, paintings, and sculpture by Colette Crutcher and Isaac Roller. The exhibit will open January 7 2017, with a reception for the public on January 7, 2017 from 5PM to 8PM. The artists will be present to welcome the audience and visitors. There will be an artists' talk at 7PM. The exhibition will run through January 31, 2017.
 
Colette Crutcher has been creating and exhibiting painting, collage, assemblage, sculpture and ceramics in San Francisco for 35+ years.  A 1996 Recology artist in residence, she continues to explore environmental concerns in her work and to make use of recycled materials.  Her body of public artwork, which includes the Aztec goddess mural at 16th St. and Sanchez (Tonantsin Renace), the tiled serpent sculpture at the Mission’s 24th St. Minipark, created with her husband Mark Roller, and three massive mosaic and handmade tile staircases, a collaboration with Aileen Barr, has attracted tourists from across the country and around the world.
 
Isaac Roller is a Brooklyn-based artist and recent graduate of Pratt Institute.  His highly-detailed surreal pen and wash drawings include a 30’ long scroll. 
 
Garden of Earthly Dismay  presents the responses of two artists, one emerging, one mid-career, who happen to be mother and son, to the very strange spiritual landscape we face in 2017. Asculptural collaboration was created specifically for this show.

Think Round Fine Arts will host this exhibit through the end of January, with gallery hours from 8AM-12PM on Fridays and Saturdays and by appointment, 2140 Bush Street Suite 1B, (between Fillmore and Webster) San Francisco CA, 94115. Gallery entrance is off of the garage driveway. For information, call: (415) 771-2198 or email: heidi@heidihardin.com 

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To view details of artworks by Colette Crutcher, click the image below:

 

To view more artworks by Isaac Roller, click the image below:

 

aRTIST STATEMENTS

COLETTE CRUTCHER

As a mother, I have experienced pride in my son’s growing mastery of his medium, while being somewhat disturbed by the grotesque and ominous feel of his creations.  Increasingly, however, a dystopian view seems the only sane response to a nation and a world spinning rapidly out of balance. My own recent paintings reflect this dark view, while pieces created in the turmoil of the early 2000’s take on a new and disturbing relevance. Hope dwells in the facing of our fears, and in the energy of a new generation of artists unwilling to accept the diminishment of our humanity.

ISAAC ROLLER

This 32 x 2.5 foot scroll chronicles the changing relationships between man, animal, the environment and the self. Read right to left, it explores many different thematic elements through its own visual narrative, which uses size and placement, fluid groupings of transforming figures and repeated imagery to lend weight and significance to its story and characters. The figures depicted move through and transmogrify into both their environment and each other, turning from human to animal to vegetable and joining with the landscape itself.

I came up with the idea for the piece while studying in Japan. There I came across several scrolls from the Edo period and earlier, including "The Scroll of the Frolicking Animals" and "Night Parade of 100 Demons." Aside from being captivated by the skill and fluidity of the drawing, I noticed that the scrolls couldn't take place over a single moment like western painting, as the characters interact with each other. However, I realized this could be taken further. The Edo scrolls contained small stories but had no overarching narrative. Having been a fan of comics specifically and narrative art in general I set out to combine the formats, using tall verticals throughout the composition as panel borders and indicating the passage of time both through repeated yet changing figures and changing settings and times of day.

 

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

COLETTE CRUTCHER

A San Franciscan for 30+ years, Colette Crutcher has worked in multiple media:  painting, collage, sculpture, assemblage, and more.  Since the late 90’s, she has focused on public art, mostly mosaics and handmade ceramic tile, while continuing to create and exhibit more intimate pieces. Her best-known works are the mixed media mural Tonantsin Renace, two massive tiled staircases in the Sunset District created with Aileen Barr, and the tiled Quetzalcoatl serpent in the playground at the Mission’s 24th St. Minipark, a collaboration with her husband Mark Roller.  Other examples of her tile work can be seen at the Chinatown Recreation Center, Ping Yuen Housing Project, the Balboa Streetscape project (Balboa Ave at 34th and 39th Ave), and at the western end of Taraval Ave.

A formative influence in her career was a Recology artist residency (called Norcal at the time) in 1995.  This program provides studio space and a stipend for artists interested in using recycled materials in innovative ways.  Never having created mosaics before, she rescued various materials from the landfill and launched herself into a major sculptural project using wood, glass, tile and sheet metal.  This piece (Arch: Mother and Child) is still on display at the Joseph Johnson Memorial Sculpture garden.

Her gallery works include paintings and drawings on paper and wood, assemblage sculptures and wall pieces, paper mache and and ceramic sculptures.  She is inspired by the popular and fine art of many cultures, which she and Mark investigate on their travels, the endangered natural world, and by her childhood self, who is allowed to come out and play in the studio.

ISAAC ROLLER

I was born in San Francisco in 1990 to a family of artists. Despite my parents being artists and my teachers praising me as creative, up until the fifth grade I wanted to be a scientist. An astronomer specifically. Something about the exactitude, the certainty with which you could predict the behavior or attributes of celestial bodies far bigger or hotter or more remote than the mind could imagine alone seemed to fold out into ideas about existence, the future, what it means to be human. Space was big but a scientist could measure its vastness and perhaps in discovering its dimensions one could begin to get a feel for the more ethereal questions as well. Of course, I wouldn't have put it like that at the time. When you're eight or nine years old space is just cool. I attended lectures by Michio Kaku, a Stanford professor of theoretical physics. I don't know if I totally understood them but I kept going. I was a weird kid.

Then one day in fifth grade I was drawing a horse in my notebook. I didn't want to stop, even when everyone could clearly see that it was a horse so I just kept adding more and more. I drew out every hair on it's hide until the whole thing was a uniform graphite grey. Not yet knowing much about formal concerns, the hairy horse wasn't much more bold, graphic or distinct than the sketched outline had been. There was something about it, though. Having lost myself in the process I felt something akin to what I sensed in the vast world of astronomy. Something that was much bigger than myself that asked the metaphysical questions, yet had a concrete measurable aspect as well. The horse I had drawn was most certainly a horse but it had been translated and redefined through being put down on paper. It wasn't just a horse anymore. From then on I decided to become an artist.


2016 Exhibitions

 

October-December         Heidi Hardin


Heidi Hardin. 2016. Book II: Friday Night, May 15, 1964 / The Pow Wow, Oil on Aluminum Feather Panel, 1' x 5' ___________________________ Heidi Hardin Oklahoma is not O.K./Soul Retrieval Journey 2016 ...recalling ACEs* - Seeking Silver Linings: Books II-VII Paintings and stories Featuring original music by Jonathan Sacks**   October 22 - December 30, 2016 Gallery Hours: 8AM - 12 PM Fridays and Saturdays Reception: Saturday and Sunday, October 22-23, 2016 from Noon - 6PM with Artist's Talks at 4PM Think Round Fine Arts 2140 Bush Street, Suite 1B, San Francisco CA 94115 (between Fillmore and Webster. Gallery entrance is on the driveway.) _______________________ Think Round Fine Arts is proud to present Oklahoma is not O.K./Soul Retrieval Journey 2016 ...Recalling ACEs — Seeking Silver Linings: Books II-VII by fine artist Heidi Hardin. Hardin has created sixteen new paintings and six books that are set in a dramatic sound environment featuring the original music of her long term collaborator Jonathan Sacks. As part of San Francisco Open Studios, this exhibit will open October 22nd with a two day reception for the public on October 22nd and 23rd, 2016 from noon to 6 p.m. with an Artist's Talk both days at 4pm. The artist will be present to welcome visitors throughout the exhibition that will run through December 30th. Gallery hours are 8-noon Fridays and Saturdays, and by appointment.  Ms. Hardin’s current exhibition, Oklahoma is not O.K./Soul Retrieval Journey 2016, examines six adverse childhood experiences that her two brothers, Chris and Mark, and she endured in 1964, when they were ten, eleven and thirteen years old, while under the protection and care of Ms. Hardin’s mother and step-father. She presents six stories that she wrote in 2004 while taking a memoir class for survivors of trauma conducted by Alan Kaufman. These stories were left untouched and unread, and have remained unedited from the day that they were written. Their subject matter presents a wide range of family trauma—from domestic violence and criminal child endangerment; hence the difficulty in returning to them…until now. Ms. Hardin’s intent is to demonstrate that life’s fullest potential can be reached by those who have faced even the most extreme environmental conditions even from the youngest age. Ms. Hardin sought to remember her traumatic past, and now has remembered. Now, she seeks the silver linings born of these experiences—and there are many, not the least of which is Ms. Hardin’s birth vision, the completion of The Human Family Tree/A Walk Through Paradise… and the creation of The Center for the Human Family. For this reason, also on display in the studio gallery, will be scores of portraits of subject families who are participants in her Human Family Tree Project. These individuals, as well as friends in recovery, represent her broader family, the human family. Together they have given Ms. Hardin the courage to finally speak the truth for herself. For all this a6nd her past experiences now in perspective, she is most grateful.  For information, please call: (415) 771-2198 / (415) 602-9599  or email: heidi@heidihardin.com.  _______________________ *ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences). For more information, please visit:  www.acestudy.org or https://www.ted.com/speakers/nadine_burke_harris_1 **Johnathan Sacks. 2015. Incantations: Book V, performed by the Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra                                                                                                                                        * * * A press kit with artists' statements, bios, and images can be found at: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ggv8adtiye3tio7/AABq_lqpT1mm0EKWRqFeaNQ3a?dl=0                                                                                                                                       * * *  To view more artworks by Heidi Hardin (most of which are still in progress), click the image below:

Heidi Hardin. 2016. Book II: Friday Night, May 15, 1964 / The Pow Wow, Oil on Aluminum Feather Panel, 1' x 5'

___________________________

Heidi Hardin

Oklahoma is not O.K./Soul Retrieval Journey 2016
...recalling ACEs* - Seeking Silver Linings: Books II-VII

Paintings and stories
Featuring original music by Jonathan Sacks**
 

October 22 - December 30, 2016
Gallery Hours: 8AM - 12 PM Fridays and Saturdays
Reception: Saturday and Sunday, October 22-23, 2016 from Noon - 6PM with Artist's Talks at 4PM

Think Round Fine Arts
2140 Bush Street, Suite 1B, San Francisco CA 94115
(between Fillmore and Webster. Gallery entrance is on the driveway.)

_______________________

Think Round Fine Arts is proud to present Oklahoma is not O.K./Soul Retrieval Journey 2016 ...Recalling ACEs — Seeking Silver Linings: Books II-VII by fine artist Heidi Hardin. Hardin has created sixteen new paintings and six books that are set in a dramatic sound environment featuring the original music of her long term collaborator Jonathan Sacks.

As part of San Francisco Open Studios, this exhibit will open October 22nd with a two day reception for the public on October 22nd and 23rd, 2016 from noon to 6 p.m. with an Artist's Talk both days at 4pm. The artist will be present to welcome visitors throughout the exhibition that will run through December 30th. Gallery hours are 8-noon Fridays and Saturdays, and by appointment.

 Ms. Hardin’s current exhibition, Oklahoma is not O.K./Soul Retrieval Journey 2016, examines six adverse childhood experiences that her two brothers, Chris and Mark, and she endured in 1964, when they were ten, eleven and thirteen years old, while under the protection and care of Ms. Hardin’s mother and step-father. She presents six stories that she wrote in 2004 while taking a memoir class for survivors of trauma conducted by Alan Kaufman. These stories were left untouched and unread, and have remained unedited from the day that they were written. Their subject matter presents a wide range of family trauma—from domestic violence and criminal child endangerment; hence the difficulty in returning to them…until now. Ms. Hardin’s intent is to demonstrate that life’s fullest potential can be reached by those who have faced even the most extreme environmental conditions even from the youngest age.

Ms. Hardin sought to remember her traumatic past, and now has remembered. Now, she seeks the silver linings born of these experiences—and there are many, not the least of which is Ms. Hardin’s birth vision, the completion of The Human Family Tree/A Walk Through Paradise… and the creation of The Center for the Human Family. For this reason, also on display in the studio gallery, will be scores of portraits of subject families who are participants in her Human Family Tree Project. These individuals, as well as friends in recovery, represent her broader family, the human family. Together they have given Ms. Hardin the courage to finally speak the truth for herself. For all this a6nd her past experiences now in perspective, she is most grateful. 

For information, please call: (415) 771-2198 / (415) 602-9599  or email: heidi@heidihardin.com. 

_______________________

*ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences). For more information, please visit:  www.acestudy.org or https://www.ted.com/speakers/nadine_burke_harris_1

**Johnathan Sacks. 2015. Incantations: Book V, performed by the Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra


                                                                                                                                       * * *

A press kit with artists' statements, bios, and images can be found at: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ggv8adtiye3tio7/AABq_lqpT1mm0EKWRqFeaNQ3a?dl=0

                                                                                                                                      * * *

 To view more artworks by Heidi Hardin (most of which are still in progress), click the image below:

 

ARTIST'S STATEMENT

My MFA exhibition, Oklahoma is O.K./Seasonal Rituals 1959, was painted from January through June 1979 in New York City in a spacious studio (55 Water Street) in the financial district on the East River. It was provided by the Whitney Museum of American Art. I was a participant in their Independent Study Program for Painters and Sculptors.

It has been nearly forty years since painting my family from old family photos and home movies in an effort to remember “What happened?” I had almost no memory of my childhood and wondered, in my paintings, why? My current exhibition, Oklahoma is not O.K./Soul Retrieval Journey 2016, examines six adverse childhood (ACEs)[1] experiences that my two brothers, Chris and Mark, and I endured in 1964, when we were ten, eleven and thirteen years old, while under the protection and care of my mother and my step-father.

A small town medical doctor, and diagnosed paranoid schizophrenic, Mel, my step dad, was considered by townsfolk to be an excellent doctor and gifted surgeon. As a husband, step-dad, and human being he was pure torture—because he himself was tortured by the family disease of mental illness and alcoholism. His illnesses infected all of us. However, this pairing of my mother and Mel, I now come to understand, was simply an amplification of the codependence, alcoholism, and sex addiction, which destroyed my mother and natural father’s marriage four years earlier.

In Oklahoma is not O.K./Soul Retrieval Journey 2016 …Recalling ACEs—Seeking Silver Linings: Books II-VII, I present six stories that I wrote in 2004 while taking a memoir class for survivors of trauma conducted by Alan Kaufman. These stories are set during the summer of 1964, when we were living with mother and Mel. The chapters were left untouched and unread, and have remained unedited from the day that they were written. Their subject matter presents a wide range of family trauma—from domestic violence to criminal child endangerment; hence the difficulty in returning to them…until now.   Unfortunately, Chris, Mark, and I were separated after nine moves trying to get away from this battering relationship. How did I do it—return to these stories now?

In 2015, after completing a book (titled Up to Age Six) that describes and illustrates my earliest traumas of my childhood home, I called my therapist at Kaiser and said, “if you don’t get me some help, I’m going to get a gun and kill myself.” I had finally remembered what happened, and I was not happy about it! She told me that Kaiser Permanente had a new, experimental group starting the next day for PTSD survivors. I got the last seat in the class, and began the next day to learn to listen to another trauma survivor without affect, judgement, sympathy, or any comment other than thank you. I learned to ask the same question over and over again until my peer partner in this program was able to come to her own inner wisdom and control over her troubling traumas, behaviors, emotions, or feelings. In this way, my peer partner has listened to me over the past eighteen months and this has helped me to find a way to finally move life-threatening experiences from my childhood (circling endlessly in my amygdala, holding me in a constant state of hypervigilance and extreme stress) that have kept me frozen for forty years in a state of complete terror—for my life, my brothers’ lives, and the life of my mother.

Through the CSDP[2], the name of the trauma resolution peer program, now known as Turning the Tide of Trauma, my traumas, which dictated behaviors, emotions, intrusive thoughts and overwhelming feelings, have moved from my amygdala, to my hippocampus where I now hold these events as stories, not as ever-present dangers. Amazing, huh? In 18 months I have corrected my brain’s neural networks that had been overstimulating me to dangers that were long past—sixty years past in some cases.

In August 2016, in order to acknowledge the contribution of my mother’s body to the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation at a luncheon with the medical students who will learn anatomy from this courageous gift, and to celebrate our birthdays and that we share in the same week, we were finally reunited. Thanks to my brother Chris, we journeyed back to the towns and homes, creeks and rivers where we each lost parts of ourselves many decades ago when we were with mother and Mel. This was a journey that I photographed and have used as source material for my new paintings. I consider this an alignment of my past with my present. These new photos and new paintings are a reflection of my soul recovery from these traumas.

Now, I ask for you, please, to share with me what, up until now, was unspeakable, unpaintable: six stories painted in panoramic views, narrated in panoramic flip books, and orchestrated by the original music of Jonathan Sacks[3]. My intent is to demonstrate that life’s fullest potential can be reached by those who have faced even the most extreme environmental conditions even from the youngest age.

I sought to remember my traumatic past, and now have remembered. Now, I seek the silver linings born of these experiences—and they are many, not the least of which is my birth vision, the completion of The Human Family Tree/A Walk Through Paradise… (Paradise…) and the creation of The Center for the Human Family. For this reason, also on display in the studio gallery, will be scores of portraits from Paradise…

Heidi Hardin / October 8, 2016

_____________________________________

[1] ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences). For more information, please visit: www.acestudy.org orhttps://www.ted.com/talks/nadine_burke_harris_how_childhood_trauma_affects_health_across_a_lifetime?language=en

[2] Community Self-Care Demonstration Program. Created by Diana Canant of Ardicare, Inc. Itis now a program of Think Round, Inc. For more information, please visit www.turningthetideoftrauma.org

[3] Los Angeles Composer Jonathan Sacks is my life-long collaborator. We are fellow graduates of Master’s program in art and music from UC San Diego. Sacks’ orchestrations are part of Hollywood blockbusters like Bugs Life, Monsters, Inc., Toy Stories, and Seabiscuit.  


ABOUT THE ARTIST 

Originally from Oklahoma City, Heidi Hardin received her Masters of Fine Arts degree in Painting in 1979 and Bachelor of Arts in Biology and Visual Arts from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) in 1976. Her teachers included Manny Farber, Patricia Patterson, Eleanor and David Antin, Alexis Smith and Kim McConnell. She spent her last year of graduate study at the Whitney Museum of American Arts Independent Study Program for Painters and Sculptors in New York City working primarily with David Diao. While at UCSD she served for several years as studio assistant to Newton and Helen Harrison. Alan Kaprow, the director of the Art Department while she was a student at UCSD, had, as did her teachers and other faculty, a major influence on her learning. She has exhibited her paintings nationally in galleries and museums for the past thirty years and has taught visual arts in San Francisco elementary and high schools, art history at the college level at UCSD and National University and drawing at City College of San Francisco.

Her exhibit/installation, Families in Paradise… (Part II of Paradise…) opened at SomArts main gallery in San Francisco receiving front page recognition in the entertainment section of the SF Chronicle in January of 2004 in a feature article titled, “Simple snapshots become loving tributes—and a mirror into our shared experiences—in Heidi Hardin’s paintings.” The Human Family Tree… (Part I of Paradise…) premiered at the Bayview Opera House in San Francisco in December 2000 to acclaim by the Senate, Congress, California State Assembly and the SF Board of Supervisors. This installation reopened at Newspace in LA on September 11, 2001. Her artwork was represented by Newspace, LA until from the early 1980s until 2006 when the gallery closed and its archives—along with Ms. Hardin's exhibits—became a part of the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D. C..

As an original Hunters Point Shipyard (HPS) Citizen’s Advisory Committee member, Ms. Hardin has been teaching community children and their families for the past twenty years about the Superfund Cleanup and Reuse of Hunters Point Shipyard in Bayview Hunters Point schools through her innovative art and science curriculum, The Children’s Mural Program (CMP). Over the years, there have been dozens of public murals painted by CMP students on view throughout the community at destinations like the Oakdale campus of City College, the SF main and local Bayview post offices, Bayview Shopping Plaza, the Anna Waden Library, the Southeast Water Treatment Facility and more. In 2010, Ms. Hardin and Think Round were awarded one of the nine public art commissions for HPS through the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency (SFRA) HPS Public Art Program. In 2010-11, more than 60 local CMP students participated in the creation of this commission, titled STREAM of CONSCIOUSNESS, a 120’ x 1’ handmade ceramic and mosaic tile mural. Thanks to the support of the SFRA Public Art Program and many involved in the redevelopment process, this artwork (1’ x 120”) will be installed in the back of two benches at the soon to be constructed Hill Point Park at HPS.

Heidi Hardin was the In-Schools Visual Arts Programming Director for the Bayview Opera House, a position she held (until 2007) for fifteen years. For her work as a community artist, in 2010 she received KCBS News’ prestigious Jefferson Award. She was recognized by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in 2001 receiving their Environmental Achievement Award for Region 9 for “outstanding leadership in protecting the environment and public health for this and future generations,” for her Children’s Mural Program, a Bayview Opera House In-School Arts Program that has served more than 4,000 community children. She retired in 1999 as a Museum Artist at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco where she supervised the Doing and Viewing Art and Big Kids/Little Kids arts programs for four years to pursue her career as a fine artist, creating The Human Family Tree/A Walk Through Paradise…seven installations (Paradise…). She served on the Mayor’s Citizen’s Advisory Committee for Reuse of Hunters Point Shipyard for twelve years and on the Southeast Community Facility Commission from 1999 to 2003.

All of Ms. Hardin’s work as a community-based artist and as a practicing fine artist are now held in trust in the vision, mission and objectives of Think Round, Inc., a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, which she formed in the summer of 2004. The mission of Think Round, Inc. is to demonstrate life’s fullest potential through the arts and sciences especially where environmental concerns meet neighborhoods. Think Round, Inc. will also expand programs offered to children, teens, and seniors of Bayview Hunters Point and the Bay Area related to healthy environments, as well as accommodate the funding and creation of her vision, The Human Family Tree/A Walk Through Paradise...seven installations and The Center for the Human Family.

Think Round, Inc. offices and Think Round Fine Arts (formerly Hardin Studios), relocated in 2012 to expanded facilities including exhibition, studio and teaching spaces with a modest art and science library. The gallery space, Think Round Fine Arts, at Think Round, Inc.'s new offices, will host by appointment only, Ms. Hardin's own artwork, as well as the fine artworks of many San Francisco contemporary masters of paintings, prints, sculpture. In addition to directing Think Round and Think Round Fine Arts, Heidi Hardin will focus her attention in the coming years on the completion of her “birth vision,” The Human Family Tree/A Walk Through Paradise...seven installations and the creation of The Center for the Human Family.

Think Round, Inc. board of directors has expanded to bring on a new program called Turning the Tide on Trauma for individuals and families who are suffering from current and past adverse childhood experiences.

###

 

 

September          Mark Roller

Mark Roller. Pacing the Void (In Her Mind So Be It), 2014, mixed media on paper, 39" x 50"

Mark Roller. Pacing the Void (In Her Mind So Be It), 2014, mixed media on paper, 39" x 50"

Recent Work
Paintings and Drawings by Mark Roller

Think Round Fine Arts
2140 Bush Street, Suite 1B, San Francisco CA 94115
(between Fillmore and Webster. Gallery entrance is on the driveway.)

September 5 - September 30, 2016
Gallery Hours: 8AM-12PM Fridays and Saturdays
Reception: Saturday September 10, 4:30PM - 7PM

Think Round Fine Arts is pleased to present Recent Work, a new exhibit of paintings and drawings by Mark Roller. The exhibit will open September 5, 2016 with a reception for the public on September 10, 2016 from 4:30 - 7 p.m. The artist will be present to welcome the audience and visitorsThe exhibition will run through September 30th.

The paintings and drawings on display will be part of a long term project, a serial portrait of the artist’s wife, which has been the primary focus of his work for almost 30 years.  Each piece is an attempt to visually portray some aspect of her subjective experience, through the medium of her body and the surrounding context of symbols and/or objects and landscapes. Part of the impetus behind this unusual endeavor is to push the portrait to the limits of its potential to impress upon the viewer the full factual reality of the subject—a physical and psychic likeness made up of the many permutations our selves undergo as we move through time. Therefore, each piece is less an independent production than it is an element in a whole which comprises a single on-going, open-ended work.

Think Round Fine Arts will host this exhibit through the end of September, with gallery hours from 8AM-12PM on Fridays and Saturdays and by appointment, 2140 Bush Street Suite 1B, (between Fillmore and Webster) San Francisco CA, 94115. Gallery entrance is off of the garage driveway. For information, call: (415) 771-2198 or email: heidi@heidihardin.com and visit: http://www.thinkround.org/index/#/our-artists/

***

To view more artworks by Mark Roller, click the image below:

Artist statement

In the late 1980s, I began a project which quickly became the sole focus of my work: what I call a "serial portrait" of a single person, Colette Crutcher, my wife. Starting with the desire to document the physical and psychological changes she underwent while pregnant with our first child, I became fascinated by the possibilities inherent in an ongoing depiction of an individual through time; time being the dimension missing from a conventional portrait. Doing a series of works, over a long period, has allowed me to attempt to represent Colette, in many different aspects, as a whole person. Of course, this attempt will always remain just that, an attempt, the goal elusive, the results provisional. 

Rather than dealing in the objective facts of Colette's life, I want, instead, to convey, as completely as I can, my understanding of her subjective experience, through the medium of her body, the outward manifestation of her inward self. Poses and gestures, and indeed, all of the other elements in a sculpture or painting, are meant to express a state of mind or emotion, especially those states which recur and are therefore most characteristic of Colette. However, in my slow-witted way, I've come to recognize how much of myself leaks into the work, no matter how much I want it to be about her-- paradoxically my portrait of Colette becomes a self-portrait as well. Although I find this troublesome, I accept it as unavoidable. People sometimes assume the work is a self-portrait by Colette herself, but I have no interest in encouraging that mistake. The work is most definitely a portrait-- done by an observer looking at his subject from the outside, getting things wrong and filling in the blanks with his own subjective materials (Colette saw the inevitability of this from the outset).

I hope that my work, with its admittedly peculiar single-mindedness, does impinge on some larger issues, most especially the problematical history of male representations of women. The privileging of the "male gaze" and the objectification of women in Western image making seems, to me, to be the consequence of a process of generalization in which women are reduced to stereo- (or arche-) types. By being as specific as I possibly can be, I want to counteract this pernicious generalizing impulse, so that the result is not more depictions of "Woman", or depictions which make some statement about "women" as a class. Rather, my ambition is to confront the viewer with an evocation of an individual, a full-fledged person who happens to be a woman (as I happen to be a man). In certain pieces, Colette's gender is thematically important, even central; in other pieces, it's not significant at all. Can the male desire to make images of women, which seems so deeply rooted (in our culture, at least), be redeemed in this fashion? I don't know, but it seems worth trying.

Other "big ideas", like questions concerning the limits of representation and our ability to truly know another human being, have occupied my mind intermittently over the years. But, the overwhelming reason I do what I do is ultimately deeply personal, and very simple: Colette is the most significant fact of my life. I can't think of another subject that could engage me as fully. 

Mark Roller

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Born and raised in Los Angeles, Mark Roller demonstrated an aptitude for drawing at an early age, deciding on a career in the arts after realizing that being an astronaut and traveling to other planets might be more fear-inducing than exciting.  

His early work fit more or less neatly into thecontemporary realist category.  The human figure has been his central subject since the seventies, with figure compositions arranged in beach and urban settings as a major theme.

In 1978 he moved to San Francisco, where he met and married Colette Crutcher.  They have two grown children, Zoe and Isaac.

It was during his wife Colette’s first pregnancy, in 1986-87, that, unsatisfied with conventional realism, he began to focus exclusively on her—the beginning of an ongoing serial portrait that continues to this day.   The body and mental universe of the person with whom he was most intimately emotionally and physically entwined became his lifelong subject, refining and deepening with the yearsThrough drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, collage, assemblage, and a self-created technique of cast and stenciled low relief, he explores the mind-boggling multiplicity of experience as one human being engages with another.

Beyond this primary source of inspiration, his work is fed by a voracious consumption of visual imagery of all kinds.  He finds further inspiration, or to be more accurate, ideas and forms to appropriate, or most precisely, to steal, in a promiscuous range of sources from Inuit masks to fashion photography, as well as the grand traditions of art from one end of Eurasia to the other.


JULY-AUGUST     JENNIFER EWING & LEO GERMANO

CAPTURING SPIRIT
Paintings, Sculpture, Prints - by Jennifer Ewing
Photography - by Leo Germano


Think Round Fine Arts
2140 Bush Street, Suite 1B, San Francisco CA, 94115
(between Fillmore and Webster. Gallery entrance is on the driveway.)

July 3 - August 30, 2016
Gallery Hours: 9AM-12PM, Fridays and Saturdays
Reception: Friday July 22, 5:30PM-8PM

Think Round Fine Arts is pleased to present a new exhibit of paintings, sculpture, and prints by Jennifer Ewing and photography by Leo Germano. The exhibit will open July 1st, 2016 with a reception for the public on July 22, 2016 from 5:30 - 8 p.m. At the reception there will be artists talk and presentation of Jennifer’s etching and dry point techniques on a copper plate with examples in her collection of Spirit Boat prints available through the gallery. The artists will be present to welcome the audience and visitors of this show, CAPTURING SPIRITThe exhibition will run through August 30th.

CAPTURING SPIRIT is the common thread between two long time San Francisco artists who share their journeys as a married couple. They now share the gallery space at Think Round Fine Arts to present their ways of depicting spirit within their diverse collections. Their choice of subjects and media are especially rich in texture and mood. For Jennifer, she investigates the unseen world around us and distilled this into a Spirit Boat or ladder. For Leo, it is about the realities and the components of the city and of nature that contains the spirit he wants to bring forward onto paper.

Think Round Fine Arts will host this exhibit through August, with gallery hours from 9AM-12PM on Fridays and Saturdays and by appointment, 2140 Bush Street Suite 1B, (between Fillmore and Webster) San Francisco CA, 94115. Gallery entrance is off of the garage driveway. For information, call: (415) 771-2198 or email: heidi@heidihardin.com and visit: http://www.thinkround.org/index/#/our-artists/

***

To view more artworks by Jennifer Ewing, click on the image below:

 

To view more artworks by Leo Germano, click on the image below:

aRTIST STATEMENTs

Jennifer ewing

CAPTURING SPIRIT


Jennifer Ewing continues her exploration of Spirit Boats in new work that invites the viewer to journey with an ancient archetype in her paintings, sculptures and prints. A Spirit Boat is a universal symbol of movement across the unknown to a place of greater personal power. It is a timeless extension of ourselves and gives us a vehicle for our imagination to soar to new heights. 

Her most recent paintings reference environmental themes. “Crying Ice” and “Frost Fire” series evoke other worlds where elements collide and vie for attention. She is influenced by the Robert Frost Poem, “Fire and Ice” as she looks to future possible scenarios.

Her etchings are windows into non-ordinary reality where the Spirit Boat exists in a heightened state of awareness. There is an influence of her studies with a curandera, Tereza Iniguez-Flores, where the mystical is brought forward in space and time.

Sculpture has its presence. There is a second symbol of movement that is emerging alongside of the Spirit Boat, that of the ladder. A ladder offers choices and is a tool to access lower and upper worlds. 

Jennifer Ewing/July 1, 2016


leo germano

CAPTURING SPIRIT


My photography captures significant aspects of everyday urban experience. Collections of my work feature strong design elements -patterns, lines and compositions which help me see the world in a more connected way. These basic art elements give me a way to find the “spirit” within a common everyday subjects that I keep returning to over time. 


I find details of architecture, industry, and commerce in our environment by investigating structures being built, container ship traffic, and delivery of goods that expand on the on-going theme of fast relationships found in the city.


Often a detail will magnify my understanding of a larger whole. The same works for my Landscape subjects, adding the counterpoint of nature to my urban interests. I see a commonality in the way details and close-up views are suggestive of the larger whole that is implied through the way I crop my images. My interest is in the nuances of spirit- whispers of things unseen and suggested by quiet communion in nature.  

Leo Germano/July 1, 2016


 aBOUT THE ARTISTS

jENNIFER eWING

Jennifer, a lifelong artist, has always chose to pursue creative work first as a teacher, and later as an illustrator, muralist, museum educator and entrepreneur.  She leads workshops in various venues where others join her in an artful healing experience. 

Jennifer’s work with “Spirit Boats” began in 2005 as a response to the death of her father. Employing sculpture, painting, drawing, print making and installations to describe an inner journey she offers an invitation for others to travel within her boats. Her blog can be found at www.jenniferewing.com, She has exhibited her work widely in various San Franciscio Bay Area venues over the past twenty five years.

As Artist in Residence at the San Francisco deYoung Museum in 2011, she exhibited “Spirit Boat Directions” andled workshops for art making, In 2014 her work, “Healing Spirit Boats” was shown in conjunction with the Living Shaman Museum of the SF Presidio and she mounted a solo exhibit “Ascensions” at Think Round, Inc. gallery space.  In 2015, she curated and contributed work to a three artist show, “Currents” at the China Brotsky Gallery, SF Presido. 

As a senior teaching artist at the SF Fine Arts Museums and a museum educator at the Contemporary Jewish Museum she works with adult and children’s programs, designs projects and leads tours of exhibitions. Jennifer also works with Alzheimer’s programs at both museums for the past four years helping early stage patients find meaning and comfort through engaging with art.

Since 1989 she has ran her mural business, Ewing and Germano with husband, Leo Germano specializing in fine art services for commercial and residential clients.  In 2012, she launched two additional business for organizational learning; How to Navigate Change for team building and Making Your Mark Now offering drawing programs in partnership with Leo Germano. 

Jennifer lives and works in an historic SF Mission District artist community, Developing Environments where she offers a variety of art based workshops.  She is an ongoing student of Tereza Inîgues Flores, a well-known San Francisco healer and curandera.

LEO GERMANO

Leo Germano is a life-long artist and a San Francisco native, He grew up in South San Francisco and began his art education at the College of San Mateo, Coyote Point campus, followed by a B.F.A. from the Chouinard School of Art in Los Angeles. Two years of working in the Peace Corps in Malaysia introduced different ways of life viewed through his camera that became a constant companion in his teaching and travels. While in Asia, he worked at the Bangkok World newspaper where he exercised his design, drawing and photojournalism skills. Returning to Los Angeles in 1968, he worked as an architectural draftsman, leading to a move to Rochester New York to become an assistant city planner and freelance illustrator. Returning to San Francisco in 1973,  he worked in architectural and engineering offices as a graphic specialist and department supervisor. Leaving his career in Graphics in 1988, he joined his wife, Jennifer Ewing, as a partner in Ewing & Germano Studios, a fine-arts mural business.

Leo has created collections of humorous drawings, graphite rubbings of street manhole covers and travel photography over the past five decades. In 2000, digital photography opened up the digital darkroom, and photography became his most prolific artistic output.  His studio is located in a historic artist live-work collective, Developing Environments, in the Mission District of San Francisco where he serves as CEO of the Management Team.

Currently, he is in his second year as a mentor with First Exposures, a program that empowers teens through photography. His art and photographyhave been widely exhibited in the Bay Area since his first solo show @ Stanford Office Spaces in 1996. He has shown work in SF Open Studios since 1998 and contributed to Artspan and Art for Aids Auctions since 20014. He is involved in and contributes to the First Expressions photo exhibit fund raisers since 2015,
Noteable San Francisco shows include a 2010 solo show, “Urban Patterns” at Gallery 323, “Underfoot”, a 2012 group show at Workspace,  Aperto Cafe in 2013,  and “Currents”, a collaborative show with Jennifer Ewing and Reddy Leib at the China Brodsky Gallery in the Presidio. 


 

May-June    Bestie Miller-Kusz

Betsie Miller-Kusz. 2016. Tides and Paseos, Acrylic on Canvas, 54" x 50"

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                    May 1, 2016

THINK ROUND FINE ARTS, SAN FRANCISCO

High Tides & Far Paseos

 

Think Round Fine Arts is pleased to inaugurate its renovated gallery space, located at 2140 Bush St., Suite 1, San Francisco with a stunning exhibit of new paintings by Betsie Miller-Kusz. The exhibit will open Sunday May 15th, 2016 with a reception for the public from 12 – 4 p.m. The artist will be present to welcome visitors to this show, High Tides & Far Paseos. The exhibition will run through June 29th.

Miller-Kusz is a painter of singular vision, deeply influenced by living and working in San Francisco for almost 40 years. These recent paintings come from her years painting in New Mexico, where she currently lives.  She engages the figure of an ancestral protector spirit, often female, who moves among the elements of earth, air, fire and water. This being is joined at times by a male counterpart, who is also portrayed in several of these pieces.

Miller-Kusz has exhibited widely nationally, and internationally in over 20 countries. She has painted murals since the 1970’s, the best known of which is the Upper Market mural, an iconic landmark at 19th and Market St. She was the Director of the Mural Resource Center for many years, and the Director of SOMArts Gallery in San Francisco, where she curated over 100 exhibits.

Think Round Fine Arts will host this exhibit through June, with gallery hours Fridays and Saturdays nine to noon. Additional hours are by appointment. For information, call (415) 771-2198 and visit www.SomArts.org.

 

Artist's Statement

 

High Tides and Far Paseos
 

This series of paintings explores the continuum of my visual experience, traveling and living on earth’s lands and seas. My home was in San Francisco for almost 40 years, so the power of the Pacific Ocean reverberated from my very earliest works here. Now I live in New Mexico, where the mountains’ landforms throw their shadows back millions of years. So I have known transience and permanence, the movement of tides and deep time, invoked in the act of painting.

The Earth Guardian figures in these painting have accompanied my brush for many years They appear as I am painting, large ancestral beings just outside the reach of our vision. They crest ancient waves or walk distant paseos, emerging from the elements of earth, air, fire and water. They are sovereigns, often female, although the recent works find a male counterpart appearing as well. Their faces are universal, informed by all the places I have been privileged to visit, during decades of exhibitions and international projects. 

So the paintings are returning to their place of genesis after sojourns in wide-open spaces and the amplitude of mesas and mountains, I am deeply grateful to Think Round Fine Arts for making this cyclic movement possible in my work. 

Betsie Miller-Kusz
May 2016

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To view more of Betsie Miller-Kusz's paintings, click on the image below.


About the Artist

 

Betsie Miller-Kusz was born in Los Alamos, New Mexico. She lived and painted in San Francisco for over thirty years, and has exhibited widely in the San Francisco Bay Area, as well as New York, Santa Fe, and many areas of California. She now lives in New Mexico, where she owns a small rancho and studio, drawing continual inspiration from her surroundings in the beautiful Jemez Valley. 

Her international exhibitions and projects have been held in Paris, London, Valencia, Madrid, Rome, Florence, Assisi, Buenos Aires, Mexico City, Merida, Guadalajara, Guatemala, New Delhi, Tokyo, Hiroshima, Macau, Leningrad, Ulaan Bataar, and Seoul. She has painted numerous public murals in San Francisco, and has collaborated with international artists in many projects, conferences, and cultural exchanges. Her works have been part of four International Biennales, in Florence, the Yucatan, and Tuscany. Her solo exhibitions have included Dhoomi Mal, the oldest contemporary art gallery in India, the Museo Ixchel in Guatemala, the Galeria Tonalli in Mexico City, and the Marie de 6th Arrondisement in Paris, as well as the International Maritime Museum in London, the Pinoteca Museo in Tlaxcala, Mexico, and Anagma Gallery in Valencia, Spain,

Betsie painted the last mural in the former Soviet Union, for the 2nd Human rights Conference in Leningrad, working with two Russian artists. She then painted the first modern mural in Mongolia, working with a group of artists on a 5 story building. She collaborated with Clowns without Borders for a mural painted in the basurero (garbage dump) in Guatemala City, painting with children living in unbearable conditions. She has two murals painted on small cultural centers deep in the Delta de Parana’ in Argentina, inaccessible except by small boats beyond the huge South American waterways. Her longest international collaboration has been with photographer Masaru Tanaka of Hiroshima, working together on the Peace’s New Century Project, a 15 year commitment combining their joined images for peace. This project has been exhibited widely, including the United Nations in New York and Fuller Lodge in Los Alamos, as well as the War Memorial building in San Francisco where the United Nations was founded.

Betsie taught painting classes in San Francisco for the California Arts Council, the San Francisco Recreation & Park Department and the New College of California. She served as Director of the Mural Resource Center for ten years, and then as Director of SOMArts Gallery in the South of Market Cultural Center, where she curated over one hundred exhibitions. High Tides and Far Paseos presents new work from recent years, exhibited at Think Round Fine Arts in San Francisco. 


 

2015 Exhibition

October 24-December 2015       Heidi Hardin

HARDIN STUDIOS (soon to be Think Round Fine Arts) opened in October 2012 in the upper Fillmore district of San Francisco. It is a not for profit gallery showing the artwork of Think Round students, their families, and their teachers. Think Round artist instructors are primarily fine artists with private studios at Hunters Point Shipyard or the Bayview who have taught in our acclaimed Children's Mural Programs over the past twenty years. Interested viewers are invited to openings and receptions, classes and exhibits and by appointment throughout the years. For an appointment to visit our gallery or to signup for Family Art Making classes, please contact Heidi Hardin by phone: 415-771-2198 or email: heidi@heidihardin.com 

                                                                                               Heidi Hardin. 2015. Self Portrait: Sixth Grade, Heidi Then NowPastel on Sanded Paper, 12" x 9"

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Heidi Hardin. 2015. Detail. Fake it 'til you make it! Mixed Media Collage, 14" x 11" 


7th  Grade To Do List:

  1. Fake it ’til you make it!  (My girl-next-door good looks makes that easy!)
  2. In the meantime, don’t stare in the mirror of your first vanity when listening to your younger brother being beaten during an insane spelling lesson perpetrated by Mel, your stepdad, a small town medical doctor (and diagnosed paranoid schizophrenic) whom the police do not care to reign in. 
  3. Don’t visualize blowing your mother’s head off with a shotgun between the eye for not stopping this abuse, because thirty years later, you will find yourself in a Halloween costume with dead vines surrounding your face and an oozing gunshot wound between your eyes. You will then realize you have committed a psychic suicide, and have been among the true walking dead since you were thirteen years old.
  4. Drink, blackout, throw-up, then drink to get drunk until you are 34 years old.
  5. Don’t trust your local priest. He says he wants to help you unburden about the violence between your mother and Mel, when he takes you out to a Gas Lamp dinner theater in Tulsa alone. Really, he wants to get drunk with you and see if you are easy. Clearly, certainly, unequivocally, you are NOT, so fortunately, he relents.
  6. When your mother stands up for you against Mel by taking you to buy you two suits of beautiful White Stage outfits (for buying his daughter hundreds of dollars’ worth of clothes for school and gets you a torn pair of pedal pushers from the sale table), make the white stag your patronus by feeling the deepest affinity for him. Grow antlers on the spot--you're going to need them! When you realize that Mel beat mother up for doing this, know and finally feel, that she always really did love you very, very much. Years later, be broken hearted that finding this out is what it takes to understand this about your mother. 
  7. Save the labels from those clothes (and a tub full of personal other memorabilia from junior high and high school) so that God can remind you as you make this collage of just how much your mother loved you, in spite of her frequent actions to the contrary.
  8. Be amazed at how God, just as you were promised, makes all your broken places your strengths. 

 

 

HEIDI HARDIN 

speaks about the unspeakable...
 

This Saturday and Sunday, October 24 & 25 @ 4pm
 
You are cordially invited to attend Heidi's
Open Studio reception (noon to 6) &
Artist talk (4 pm) both days.


Learn firsthand of Heidi's shocking story that begins in her kindergarten sandbox and ventures through a forest of subsequent traumas that she finally has re-membered and now re-covers in this exhibition of 41 mixed media collages titled, Self-Portraits:
K-12/Heidi, Then Then
.

More than fifty years of silence and secrets are tempered and redirected in this sequential view of each year of her life. School and family photos from kindergarten through high school are combined with challenging To Do Lists, Coping Lists and found objects to reveal how the conscious and unconscious cooperate to survive. Discover, with Heidi, how unrelenting trauma builds as family addictions and her own drinking escalate. Wonder at her innocent, sometimes destructive, often hilarious coping strategies that face down the imperious demands of denial. 

Please join Heidi and her family (Richard and Bella) and friends (all of you), for this frank, friendly exchange of about life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness--even when the stakes are so great and the circumstances so grim. 

Heidi will be welcoming visitors to this exhibition
every Monday and Wednesday from 3-6 pm
until renovations begin--hopefully in mid-November.
 
Additional hours are by appointment.
Email: heidi@heidihardin.com or
Call: 415.771.2198/415.602.9599


HARDIN STUDIOS is proud to present new mixed media collage portraits by Heidi Hardin in her current exhibit, Self-Portraits: K-12/Heidi, Then Then. Originally from Oklahoma City, Heidi Hardin received her MFA in Painting in 1979 and her BA in Biology and Visual Arts in 1976, both from the UCSD. For thirty years she has exhibited her paintings nationally in galleries and museums and has taught art at all levels. All of Ms. Hardin’s work as a community-based artist and a practicing fine artist are now held in trust in the vision, mission, and objectives of Think Round, Inc., a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that she formed in 2004. Think Round, Inc.'s office and gallery are currently under renovation and will re-open in 2016 with a new, expanded: exhibition space and roster of exhibiting artists.  In addition to directing Hardin Studios (soon to be Think Round Fine Arts), Heidi Hardin will focus her attention in the coming years on the completion of her “birth vision,” The Human Family Tree/A Walk Through Paradise... and the creation of The Center for the Human Family.

For more information please visit www.thinkround.org


Artist's Statement

Keeping family secrets (by using sugar and alcohol) left me without a childhood and teen years that I could remember. To remember, “What happened?” in my disturbing childhood, to re-center and reignite my life, I present 41 (31 new and 10 old) mixed media collages in: Self-Portraits: K-12 Heidi, Then Then. Photos from each year of school (K-12) combine with objects to reveal a personal symbology that give meaning to those difficult, forgotten years…a personal symbology hidden to me, that was revealed over the past 28 years in my art, recovery, and various trauma therapies. Titled with the TO-DOs from my “chapters” written about them, the demands placed on me by my parents and perpetrators to protect them are revealed. Coping to keep the truth a well-guarded secret were my fantasies (mostly unconscious) that protected me from this harsh expectation.  In ...Then Then, the secrets and silence of my family give way to the truth for myself that I have struggled for nearly three decades to uncover. The denial penetrating my own childhood (suck it up, keep your mouth shut, get over it) "gave my life that edge of nonreality, of literal craziness"  that is often found in the homes of alcoholics, addicts, and the mentally ill.
 
This new work is a meditation on the dualities between truth and denial that reshape boundaries between consciousness/unconsciousness, awake/asleep, good/evil, visible/invisible, reality/fantasy, now/then, sanity/insanity and how these dualities can be created within negative and positive spaces of artworks, and between artworks on the gallery walls. The shared cultural understanding of image, text, and objects provide viewers inroads to the humor, irony, poignancy of my own stories, struggles, and a deliberately pointed message about the common struggle of families faced with mental illness and addiction. [Alcoholism and co-dependence entwine to form] "a conspiracy of silence, not only for the person who is suffering [from mental illness and/or addiction], but for everyone else who's forced to interact with that person. That's why they call [alcoholism] a family disease."
 
As a fine artist working in Southeast San Francisco community arts for the past twenty years, I have taught art and environmental science to children about the clean up and reuse of Hunters Point Shipyard. From this work and the thousands of children I have taught, I learned that no matter how traumatic or toxic one’s childhood might have been, there are those (visible and invisible) willing and able to help with the clean up and reuse of one’s life. My awareness of and trust in these processes were the heart of staying resilient as a human being while facing the darkest realities of my past, accepting them, and developing emotional maturity after 57 years of being a numb, disassociated five-year-old girl and a blacked out drunken teen.     --Heidi Hardin/October 2015



2014 Exhibition Schedule:

January              Nikki Lau

February            Marc Ellen Hamel

March                 Pernilla Persson

April                   Rebecca Haseltine

May                     Elaine Michaud

June                   Josefa Vaughan

July                    Jennifer Ewing

August               Jennifer Ewing

September         Closed

October              Closed

November          Heidi Hardin

December          Heidi Hardin



NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2014: HEIDI HARDIN

HEIDI HARDIN

The Biaye Family
Ten new portraits

November 8 - December 27, 2014
Opening Reception:
Every Saturday & Sunday in November & December, Noon-6pm


Additional hours are by appointment.
Email: heidi@heidihardin.com or call: 415.602.9599

 

Artist Statement

Snapshots from family photo albums offer an unexpected window into the shared human experiences that bridge the personal and the universal. Over the years I've re-imagined family photos in iconic collages and triptychs, created murals defining community interactions, and uncovered surprising beauty in views of flowering trees crisscrossed by utility lines. Inspired by commonalities found in family photos, my extended project Human Family Tree/A Walk through Paradiseseven installations is an evocative multimedia meditation on the experiences we share, regardless of faith, culture, or ethnicity.

Paradise… centers on families who are followers of various major world religions. Each successive installation focuses on a single religion, presenting 78 paintings along with touching objects, environmental displays, and original music. The paintings are based on photographs of the past century of families of different ethnicities, who stand as icons for all peoples who have journeyed to America to make their home. A labyrinth of footpaths and columns replicating the mythic Tree of Life creates a ‘walk through paradise’ among the paintings for the viewers. On a symbolic level these installations explore ideas about cultural self-definition, the pervasiveness of the American dream, and the universality of the human family.

To see more of Heidi Hardin's artworks, click the image below.

Heidi is also exhibiting

Plum Blossoms/Valentine's Day 2010, SF, CA
Nine new pastel drawings on sanded paper

October 25 - January 3, 2015

Invisions Optometry
1907 Fillmore Street
San Francisco, CA 94115

 

To see Plum Blossoms/Valentine's Day 2010 drawings, click the image below

JULY 2014: JENNIFER EWING

DIRECTED

DIRECTED

SPIRIT BOATS-Ascending

Paintings, Prints, & Sculptures

July 5-31, 2014

Reception & Poetry Reading
Saturday, July 26th, 5-7pm

Poetry @ 6:15-7pm
"A Pocket of Poets", four SF working poets, Nancy Wakeman, Jane Rades, Stephen Kopel, and Al Averbach will join their voices with the artwork.

Artist Statement

"Spirit Boats Ascending"
The Spirit Boat is my vehicle for moving through life and a way to explore the unseen through my paintings, sculptures and prints.
I am a Spiritboatist, one who is on a journey to honor my ancestors. Along the way, I use the boat as an invitation for transformation in the way it has been used cross culturally over time as an archetype for passage. The boat is moving up and out of time and space so this exhibit references a kind of ascension that is enhanced by the presence of a mysterious set of stairs.

To see more of Jennifer Ewing's artworks, click the image below.

JUNE 2014: JOSEFA VAUGHAN

Artist Statement

Come reflect on the influence of mentor-ship through my photographs and related objects that belonged to Leo Steinberg, one of the most brilliant and controversial art historians of the last half of the 20th century. Leo was also a dear friend and founding Advisor to the Board of ArtSeed. Sales will benefit two arts education nonprofits: ArtSeed and Think Round.

To see more of Josefa Vaughan's artworks, click the image below.

MAY 2014: ELAINE MICHAUD

White Lotus/Egypt

White Lotus/Egypt

Artist Statement

In this latest body of work, I explore both the formal structure of flowers and the often archaic meanings attached to them by different nations and groups of people—how cultures identify with particular flowers. I find the etymology as interesting and beautiful as the forms themselves. Meanings sometimes migrate from one culture to another, or are completely different from one language to another, and often morph over time. I use image, word and metaphor to try to open up meaning and understanding.

Exploring organic form in this botanical series, I forage in the strange and beautiful forms found in the plant world, whether in plain sight or hidden in the microscopic inner-workings of an organism’s life-cycle.

To see more of Elaine Michaud's artworks, click the image below.

APRIL 2014: REBECCA HASELTINE

Rebecca Haseltine

Ground Water

April 4th through the 29th
Reception: Saturday April 12, 4-7pm
Artist talk at 6pm

Hardin Studios
2140 Bush Street, Suite 1B
(between Webster and Fillmore)
San Francisco, CA 
 
Additional Hours by Appointment:  415-318-2233

 Ground Water is a show of
new pourings inspired by questions about
ground water in the ground and
ground water inside our bodies. 

Rebecca Haseltine

Artist Statement

Ground Water
Mixed media on frosted mylar 

Disturbed by the water crisis in California, I felt the need to talk about water through art making.  As usual it didn't turn out to be linear.  I have been reading about the way fracking can contaminate ground water, and for decades we've been aware that agribusiness use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides pollutes our ground water.  Recently I've read that because of the series of drought years Central Valley and Salinas Valley wells are dropping dramatically – up to 50 feet or in one case 80 feet in the past couple of years.  So deeper wells are being drilled – as if this could continue forever.  Another interesting phenomenon is happening in the Salinas Valley:  drawing more out of the aquifer is sucking salt water from the Pacific Ocean into the fresh water aquifer.  I don’t know if there are any ways we can reverse any of these issues.

I set about asking what inside the body constitutes ground water.  I came up with multiple answers:  The blood, the cerebro-spinal fluid, the interstitial fluid, and so on.  With this body of work I am exploring overlays between multiple ground waters of the body, and exploring the connection between them.  What emerges is the interlinking of systems – how one system intricately interacts with another system.  This is not political art.  It is an invitation to become aware and to become curious.  Whatever we are made of is what nature is made of.  Whatever processes happen in nature happen inside of us.  How much are we clueless about?  What happens when we are clueless?  What havoc are we wreaking inside and out by being oblivious?

 Ultimately we stumble into beauty because – I don’t know – it’s there to be uncovered.  We need reasons, apparently, to change our ways.  Why not the preservation of what is beautiful?  The infinite ways that water and flow sustain life is a good reason. 

Rebecca Haseltine approaches visual art from a somatic perspective – exploring body-based and sensory-based mark-making.  Her art investigates questions about being in a body, and recent themes include fluid pathways, the brain, and embryology. She began the estuary project a decade ago, exploring the reflection of that ecosystem within the body. Now curious about ground water she continues the inquiry about inner ecology.

Over the past 25 years she has worked in several media, beginning with large-scale movement-based drawings, to prints, to ‘pourings’, then to kinetic sculpture, photography, and now weaving ‘pouring’ and drawing together. 

Rebecca has shown her work extensively in the Bay Area and has worked collaboratively with dancers, composers, and filmmakers.  She also has a practice in bodywork and movement therapy: www.bodylearning.net.

To see more of Rebecca Haseltine's artworks, click the image below.

March 2014: PERNILLA PERSSON

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Artist Statement

‘String of Life’ is a series of work where the artist explores the impact of infrastructure within our lives.  Pernilla brings out multiple paths of what exists in her imagination and her vision of the subject. Combing her knowledge of darkroom printing and Photoshop skills she creates a result that might be similar to an alternative process photograph or an ultra modern high tech image.

-       'String of Life' is a series where I explore the digital medium.  I focus on simple lines and pattern that make an impression of flowers and leafs on paper, says Pernilla. 

To see more of Pernilla Perrson's artworks, click the image below.

February 2014: MARC ELLEN HAMEL

“Two Wildernesses” oil on canvas 46”h x 40” w

“Two Wildernesses” oil on canvas 46”h x 40” w

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Artist Statement

 For this exhibit I selected a number of works that reflect memories of my family or hometown.  Raised in Seattle and moving away in my early 20s, I have maintained close relationships with family and friends back there through frequent visits. I live here, not there, but some part of me works to close the gap. I often harken back to place, to people, locations and events that are an integral part of me. These recollections often surface to my awareness and become manifest in my artwork.  Hence, the works are my mementos.

Besides the obvious actions of holding a brush and applying paint, an important element of the creative process for me is looking, brooding, mulling, and reconsidering.   An artist working in her studio has uncharted time and space to herself as she goes about manipulating materials and creating images.  As I paint I allow myself to be in a very open place where I am as indulgent and intuitive as possible, first loosely setting out the beginnings of a painting with strokes and colors that appeal to me that day.  Once I start, the paint and my hand/arm movements lead me to the next stroke.   What I see in the marks I make then engenders thoughts in a stream of consciousness.  I grab from these what feels important, and make marks that represent the feelingsense that is surfacing.  At the same time I am quite in love with the deep colors, the buttery texture of oil paint, the surprising areas where one color meets another I keep going until a scene forms that intrigues me and pushes me onward to define it.   It’s exciting (and sometimes frustrating) to watch it unfold and then figure out how to finalize it all.

Memory is a major contributor to stream of consciousness.  At times I have wondered if perhaps I am working out” moments in my life that did not get enough attention while they were happening or that I did not understand at the time.  Or, perhaps it is simply that I want to pay homage to those moments.  Much of the urge to create the work is about declaiming: I exist. This is me, my view of the world.”*

Many pieces here are reminiscent of the landscapes of the Pacific Northwest, which I can still visit.  Others are outright keepsakes of family members who have passed on.  I created something for myself that represents them,  to “hold on to them. The assemblages are probably obvious: He Built A Life” and Glens Candies” for my difficult father, “Little Sylvias Dollhouse” for my treasured mother. Two Wildernesses is a painting honoring my brother, who died at the young age of 65.  He loved to hike in the wilderness and when we lost him we were left in our own wilderness.  As I mention these creations, see them here in public, it feels good to recall and share these loved ones again.  

.what I do is me, for that I came.”  Gerard Manley Hopkins

To view 10 more of Marc Ellen's paintings, click on the image below.

January 2014: NIKKI LAU

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Artist Statement

“Chinese Thanksgiving” is a series that explores the immigrant experience, assimilation, and what it means to be a Chinese American female. The installation showcases a meal that portrays the challenges of immigration and celebrates the strength and love of family. I am in the very unique position of having a predominantly female family. We all represent so many diverse backgrounds, but we are all a part of the Asian American experience. We are first, second or third generation. I am very interested in what each member of my family “brings to the table.” The ceramic plates of my family tells a unique story about that person. For example, my grandmother (Paw Paw) is the Mahjong tiles as that is my first memory of her. My Aunty Daisy is the mysterious and ominous black cat. Cousin Michi is a Criminal Justice Lawyer and her mother my Aunty Betty taught me how to sew. My Aunty Gina is more traditional and has had the longest and most difficult journey to America. This piece gives voice to my desire for cultural understanding and meals that bring us together.

To view more of Nikki Lau's artwork, click on the image below.

December 2013: HEIDI HARDIN

Our first exhibition in 2013 is Families of Abraham...three installations featuring selected paintings from Parts I and II of The Human Family Tree/A Walk Through Paradise...seven installations by fine artist Heidi Hardin.  (See invitation below.) To see more images from The Human Family Tree and Families in Paradise please visit: www.heidihardin.com 

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